Author Archives: ben12

AHIP Institute & Expo 2016

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INS_1015_237_Institute2016_728X150_2Join us June 15-17 in Las Vegas, booth #365, for the AHIP Institute & Expo, where thousands of health care professionals will tackle challenges, uncover opportunities, and work together to help reinvent health insurance. You’ll quickly see why it’s the Essential Event for the Health Insurance Industry.

Sessions will focus on the most critical topics in health care, including:

  • Leading in the New Health Care Economy: Industry Innovation, Disruption and Transformation
  • Creating Exceptional Experiences: Putting the Customer at the Center of Service
  • Expansion of Federal Programs in the Evolving Health Care Marketplace
  • Business Intelligence: Turning Data Analytics and Insight into Action

Attendees will have the opportunity to meet with Benefitalign experts at booth 365, discuss their business challenges and prepare a successful roadmap for 2016 and beyond.

Email contact@benefitalign.com to schedule a meeting.

 

2016 Benefits Selling Expo

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The Annual Benefits Selling Expo, will take place April 18-20, 2016  at The Diplomat Hotel  in Fort Lauderdale, FL. Visit us at booth #522.

The Benefit Selling Expo is the benefits industry’s premier educational and networking event for employee benefits brokers, advisors, agents, and consultants. Each year, the nation’s top brokers make Benefits Selling Expo their preferred destination to cultivate important relationships and obtain the most practical industry education for positioning their business for sustainable growth.

Attendees will have the opportunity to meet with Benefitalign experts at booth 522, discuss their business challenges and prepare a successful roadmap for 2016 and beyond.

Email contact@benefitalign.com to schedule a meeting.

 

 

The IHC 2nd Annual Private Exchange FORUM

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2nd Annual Private Exchange FORUM in Dallas

Booth 406| February 23-24, 2016 | Embassy Suites Frisco | Dallas

Master The Evolving Private Exchange Benefits Delivery Model.

The Private Exchange FORUM immerses you in unique collaborative conversations among peers and other key industry players. LEARN, CONNECT and SHARE insights about the complete life cycle of private exchanges, including:

  • Exchange evaluation criteria
  • Post-implementation lessons learned
  • Building the next generation employee benefits structure

An Opportunity As Big As Texas. For Employers, Brokers, Advisors, and Insurers Nationwide.

Attendees will have the opportunity to meet with Benefitalign experts, discuss their business challenges and prepare a successful roadmap for 2016 and beyond.

Email contact@benefitalign.com to schedule a meeting.

ACA Checkup: What Large Employers Need to Know about the Affordable Care Act

By George Tzinas, Chief Experience Officer, Benefitalign

Benefitalign can support your organization with robust eligibility and enrollment solutions to manage employee tracking, enrollment and reporting.

Benefitalign can support your organization with robust eligibility and enrollment solutions to manage employee tracking, enrollment and reporting.

Welcome to the second edition of The ACA Checkup – this series outlines a summary of key points of the ACA and how it can impact you, your business and your employees. This edition will continue to focus on the definitions of and regulations for employers.

The Affordable Care Act is very specific in outlining employer responsibilities for small and large employers. The size and structure of your workforce determines what taxes, subsidies and penalties apply to you. The Affordable Care Act is very specific in outlining employer responsibilities; the size and structure of your workforce determines what taxes, subsidies and penalties apply to you. The first edition focused on ACA provisions for small groups, this edition will focus on the impacts to large groups, which is much more complex and includes penalties for non-compliance.

The definition of a large employer under the ACA

Generally speaking, if an employer has at least 50 full-time employees, including full-time equivalent employees, on average during the prior year, the employer is a large employer (also known as an Applicable Large Employer or ALE) for the current calendar year, and is therefore subject to two important provisions of the ACA: the employer shared responsibility provisions and the employer information reporting provisions.

These provisions require large employers to offer qualified health coverage to their employees and provide a wide range of reports to support compliance with ACA mandates. The first step to compliance begins with determining you are a large employer as defined by the ACA rules.

Tracking

To determine the workforce size for a year, start with this formula:

The total number of Full-Time employees for each month of the prior calendar year

Plus

The total number of full-time equivalent employees (this is the sum of all your Part-Time employees) for each calendar month of the prior calendar year

Divide

The total number by 12.

 

These regulations can be a little confusing, so let’s review an example.

An employer that employs 40 full-time employees (that is, employees employed 30 or more hours per week on average) and 20 employees employed 15 hours per week on average has the equivalent of 50 full-time employees, and would be an applicable large employer (40 FT + 20 PT = 50 FTE).

Seasonal Employees

Seasonal workers are workers who perform labor or services on a seasonal basis as defined by the Secretary of Labor, and retail workers employed exclusively during holiday seasons.  For this purpose, employers may apply a reasonable, good faith interpretation of the term “seasonal worker”. Seasonal workers are taken into account in determining the number of full-time employees, with one caveat – if your seasonal workers worked 120 days or less during the calendar year, they do not count towards your employee total.

Employers will determine each year, based on their current number of employees, whether they will be considered an applicable large employer for the next year. For example, if an employer has at least 50 full-time employees (including full-time equivalents) for 2015, it will be considered an applicable large employer for 2016.

Averaging

Employers average their number of employees across the months in the year to see whether they will be an applicable large employer for the next year. This averaging can take account of fluctuations that many employers may experience in their work force across the year. The final regulations provide additional information about how to determine the average number of employees for a year, including information about how to take account of salaried employees who may not clock their hours.

You need to track this information because you could be subject to a penalty if your organization falls into either of these circumstances:

  • You offered coverage to fewer than 70 percent of your full-time employees and their dependents in 2015 and at least one full-time employee enrolled in coverage through the Health Insurance Marketplace receives a premium tax credit. The 70 percent threshold is for 2015, after 2015 this increases to 95 percent.
  • You offered coverage to at least 70 percent of your full-time employees and their dependents in 2015, but at least one full-time employee receives a premium tax credit because coverage offered was not affordable, did not provide minimum value or the full-time employee was not offered coverage. After 2015, this threshold increases to 95 percent.

Reporting

Two provisions of the Affordable Care Act that apply only to applicable large employers (ALEs) are now in effect: the employer shared responsibility provision and the employer information reporting provision for offers of minimum essential coverage.

Two 2015 forms and the related instructions that employers and insurers will send to the IRS and individuals this winter to report health care coverage they offered or provided. The new information reporting system is similar to the current Form W-2 reporting system with information about each employee. Each applicable large employer group member is required to file Forms 1095-C and 1094-C for its own employees, even if it participates in a health plan with other employers (e.g., when the parent company sponsors a plan in which all subsidies participate). Special rules apply to governmental entities and to multi-employer plans for collectively-bargained employees.

The 2015 version of Form 1095-C, Employer-Provided Health Insurance Offer and Coverage, and instructions used by employers with 50 or more full-time employees are now available on IRS.gov. These forms will be required if the employer offers an insured or self-insured health plan, or does not offer any group health plan.

Employers must file these returns annually by Feb. 28 (March 31 if filed electronically). Therefore, employers will be filing these forms for the 2015 calendar year by Feb. 28 or March 31, 2016. A copy of the Form 1095, or a substitute statement, must be given to the employee by Jan. 31 and can be provided electronically with the employee’s consent. Employers will be subject to penalties of up to $500 per return for failing to timely file the returns or furnish statements to employees. In 2016, applicable large employers must also file an annual information return and provide a statement to each full-time employee.

If you plan to file 250 or more information returns for 2015, you must file the returns electronically through the ACA Information Reports system.  The Guide for Electronically Filing Affordable Care Act (ACA) Information Returns, includes information on the communication procedures, transmission formats, business rules and validation procedures for returns that you must transmit in 2016.

If you are a self-insured ALE (employer who sponsor self-insured group health plans), there are additional provider information reporting requirements in addition to the reporting requirements for fully insured organizations. Self-insured employers – are subject to the information reporting requirements for providers of minimum essential coverage whether or not they are applicable large employers under the employer shared responsibility provisions. This means employers of any workforce size that self-insure must comply with these information reporting requirements.

Penalties

Under the Employer Shared Responsibility provisions, if Large Employers do not offer affordable health coverage that provides a minimum level of coverage to their full-time employees (and their dependents), the employer may be subject to an Employer Shared Responsibility payment if at least one of its full-time employees receives a premium tax credit for purchasing individual coverage on the Health Insurance Marketplace (Marketplace). Health coverage is affordable if the amount that the employer charges an employee for self-only coverage does not exceed 9.5 percent of the employee’s Form W-2 wages, rate of pay, or the federal poverty level for the year. A health plan provides minimum value if the plan is designed to pay at least 60 percent of the total cost of medical services for a standard population.

If an Employer Fails to offer Minimum Essential Coverage, the penalties are calculated using this formula:

For any month it does not offer minimum essential coverage to at least 95 percent of its full-time employees (and their dependents), and if at least one full-time employee receives the premium tax credit for purchasing coverage through the Marketplace, the Employer is subject to a penalty of equal to the number of full-time employees who receive a premium tax credit for that month multiplied by 1/12 of $3,000. The amount of the payment for any calendar month is capped at the number of the employer’s full-time employees for the month (minus up to 30) multiplied by 1/12 of $2,000.

If the Large Employer includes multiple members, the 30 reduction is distributed ratably across the controlled group based on each member’s number of full-time employees.

For employers with 100 or more employees, the rules are a little different: For any calendar month in 2015 or any calendar month in 2016 that falls within an employer’s non-calendar 2015 plan year, if an applicable large employer with at least 100 full-time employees (including full-time equivalents) does not offer coverage to at least 70% of its full-time employees (and their dependents), it owes an Employer Shared Responsibility payment equal to the number of full-time employees the employer employed for the month (minus 80) multiplied by 1/12 of $2,000, provided that at least one full-time employee receives a premium tax credit for that month.

If a large employer fails to comply with the information reporting requirements, they may be subject to the general reporting penalty provisions as outlined below:

  • The penalty for failure to file an information return generally is $100 for each return for which such failure occurs.  The total penalty imposed for all failures during a calendar year cannot exceed $1,500,000.
  • For returns required to be filed after December 31, 2015, the penalty for failure to file an information return generally is increased from $100 to $250 for each return for which such failure occurs.  The total penalty imposed for all failures during a calendar year after December 15, 2015 cannot exceed $3,000,000.
  • The penalty for failure to provide a correct payee statement is $100 for each statement with respect to which such failure occurs, with the total penalty for a calendar year not to exceed $1,500,000.
  • The penalty for failure to provide a correct payee statement is increased from $100 to $250 for each statement for which such failure occurs, with the total penalty for a calendar year not to exceed $3,000,000.  The increased penalty amount applies to statements required to be provided after December 31, 2015.
  • Special rules apply that increase the per-statement and total penalties if there is intentional disregard of the requirement to furnish a payee statement.

If you plan to file 250 or more information returns for 2015, you must file the returns electronically through the ACA Information Reports system.  The Guide for Electronically Filing Affordable Care Act (ACA) Information Returns, includes information on the communication procedures, transmission formats, business rules and validation procedures for returns that you must transmit in 2016.

If you are a self-insured ALE (employer who sponsor self-insured group health plans), there are additional provider information reporting requirements in addition to the reporting requirements for fully insured organizations. Self-insured employers – are subject to the information reporting requirements for providers of minimum essential coverage whether or not they are applicable large employers under the employer shared responsibility provisions. This means employers of any workforce size that self-insure must comply with these information reporting requirements.

 

What’s Next

The first step is understanding the regulations and requirements. To help you get started, the IRS published a quick start guide to help businesses understand the basics of ACA tracking and reporting:  https://www.irs.gov/pub/irs-pdf/p5196.pdf. There are also multiple additional resources at the end of this publication that answer many common questions about ACA regulations for large employers.

Large Employers face many requirements to stay compliant with ACA regulations, it’s best to work with compliance professionals to keep up with changing rules and regulations. Benefitalign can support your organization with robust eligibility and enrollment solutions to manage employee tracking, enrollment and reporting. Our systems can take the hassle out of ensuring your organization stays compliant without impacting your competitiveness. Find out what we can do for you by scheduling a demo today.

 

 

How a private benefit exchange can bend the health care cost curve

By George Tzinas, Chief Experience Officer, Benefitalign

Some have compared the changes in health care to the changes that occurred in the retirement industry 30 years ago when companies switched from pension plans to 401(k) plans and put the responsibility on consumers to pick investments. But George Tzinas, chief experience officer at Benefitalign, says it is not the same. If consumers make a mistake in their retirement planning it may not impact them for years, but if they make a mistake in benefit planning, they will feel the impact as soon as they need to see a doctor or fill a prescription, he says.

Read the whole article here.

ACA Checkup: What Small Employers Need to Know about the Affordable Care Act

Benefitalign's EmployerEngage helps you take the hassle out of employee benefits management.

Benefitalign’s EmployerEngage helps you take the hassle out of employee benefits management.

By George Tzinas, Chief Experience Officer

Welcome to the first edition of The ACA Checkup – this series offers a quick summary of key points of the Affordable Care Act (ACA) and how it can impact you, your business and your employees. This edition will focus on the definitions of and regulations for employers.

The Affordable Care Act is very specific in outlining employer responsibilities for small and large employers. The size and structure of your workforce determine what taxes, subsidies and penalties apply to you. Because there are different provisions of the ACA for small and large employers, we will tackle each segment separately, beginning with a summary for small employers first.

First, the good news – small employers are exempt from many of the ACA provisions and requirements, including the employer shared responsibility provisions and the employer information reporting provisions. Now, the less good news – the definition of a small employer is not as simple as it sounds, and, as you can expect, there are lots of rules and regulations to consider when determining your status.

Under the ACA, a Small Employer is defined by the IRS as:

An employer with fewer than 50 full-time employees, including full-time equivalent (FTE) employees, on average during the prior year. What IS an FTE? A full-time equivalent employee is an individual employed on average at least 30 hours of per week. 130 hours of service in a calendar month is treated as the monthly equivalent of at least 30 hours of service per week.

Chances are you probably have a mixed group of employees with some full-time, some part-time and maybe even seasonal workers. Well, there are regulations for non-full-time employees:

Part Time Employees Part-time employees are counted as partial FTEs. Basically, two half-time employees count as one FTE. That means 20 half-time employees are equivalent to 10 FTEs.

Seasonal Employees Seasonal workers are taken into account in determining the number of full-time employees only if they worked for more than 120 days during a calendar year.

If your regular workforce changes throughout the year, you’ll need to use average work size to determine small or large group status.

One additional item to consider – if you are part of a larger organization with common ownership, the ACA aggregates all the employees across all the related groups and considers that as a single employer.

One final note on group status – the ACA had a provision that all groups from 51 – 100 employee size would be defined as part of the small group market beginning in 2016. The president recently signed into law an amendment to the ACA that allows states the option of keeping the existing 50 employee definition or moving to the 100 employee definition. Without this change, many firms that are considered large group today would have been forced to purchase coverage in the more regulated, and more expensive, small group market.

 So now that you’ve determined your company is considered a small employer under the ACA, what do you need to know as an employer?

The IRS and Small Business Association have compiled a list of items that apply to small employers. Not all of these provisions may apply to all small groups employers. As a small group employer:

  • You must withhold and report an additional 0.9 percent on employee wages or compensation that exceed $200,000 (the employer portion of the tax remains unchanged at 1.45%).  Learn more.
  •  You may be required to report the value of the health insurance coverage you provided to each employee on his or her Form W-2.
  • Effective for the calendar year 2015, if you provide self-insured health coverage to your employees, you must file an annual return reporting certain information for each employee you cover. The first of these reports must be filed in early 2016. Refer to these Q&As from IRS for more information. Also, if you self-insure, you may also be required to pay a fee to help fund the Patient- Centered Outcomes Research Trust Fund.

Some small employers choose not to offer employer-sponsored health plans to your employees but instead offer to reimburse employees for premiums they pay for health insurance. This is called an Employer Health Care Arrangement or Employer Payment Plans. There have been changing regulations around this type of arrangement, but generally these do not satisfy the employer requirements under the Affordable Care Act and may be subject to $100/day excise tax per applicable employee. You can find out more about Employer Payment Plans on the IRS FAQ page.

Of course, there are also many other requirements that have been enforced for several years for employers of all sizes who offer group coverage – Exchange Notification, Minimum Plan Requirements, Eligibility and Enrollment Requirements.

Tax Credits

One bright spot for eligible small employers is the availability of Small Business Tax Credits. In addition to the many ACA exemptions, certain small group employers may also be eligible for Tax Credits to offset health care costs: If you have Fewer than 25 full-time equivalent employees, and meet the following criteria, you may be eligible for a Small Business Health Care Tax Credit to help cover the cost of providing coverage. To qualify your organization must meet the following criteria:

  • Have fewer than 25 full-time equivalent employees
  • Pay an average wage of less than $50,000 a year
  • Pay at least half of employee health insurance premiums
  • Purchase coverage through the small business health options program, also known as the SHOP marketplace.

It’s definitely worth investigating if you are a small business owner – the tax credits can add up to some real dollars: Up to 50 percent of premiums paid for small business employers and 35 percent of premiums paid for small tax-exempt employers.  Even if you are a small business employer who did not owe tax during the year, you can carry the credit back or forward to other tax years. Also, since the amount of the health insurance premium payments is more than the total credit, eligible small businesses can still claim a business expense deduction for the premiums in excess of the credit. That’s both a credit and a deduction for employee premium payments. To find out more and view a tax credit estimator, visit the IRS Small Business Resource page.

Running a small business today is more challenging than ever, but you don’t need to go it alone. At Benefitalign, we understand your challenges and have built solutions to keep your business competitive and compliant with health care regulations. With shopping and enrollment portals for your employees and easy to use administrative tools for you, we make benefits simple.

 Find out what we can do for your company.

BY PHONE

For any immediate questions, please call us at +1 774.847.9097.

BY EMAIL

Please email us at contact@benefitalign.com with any questions or to schedule a free demo. 

Private Exchanges Continue to Grow in Popularity

Health Care Solutions and Benefits Management – The IHC, October 13, 2015

By George Tzinas, Chief Experience Officer, Benefitalign

Private exchanges have become an increasingly popular option for employers looking to offer their employees additional health plan options while at the same time controlling costs. Until recently, private exchanges were mainly relegated to jumbo employers and early retiree populations (e.g. IBM and General Electric).

Employer-Sponsored Private Exchanges

In the past few years however, employers, including Sears, Walgreens Darden Restaurants and more recently Time Inc., have expanded their use to include active employees as well. These new private exchanges are typically paired with defined contribution models and consumer-driven health plans.

Smaller sized organizations, however, have been much slower to adopt private exchanges – surveys report that while close to 50 percent of smaller employers like the idea of a private exchange, only a small fraction of them intend to offer a private exchange for their employers in the short term. While many small groups still seem to be in the information gathering stage, there is strong evidence that private exchange models work well in small employer groups. Professional employer organizations (PEOs) have offered online private exchanges – with a lot of strings attached – in the small group market for over 10 years and currently cover approximately three million employees in small establishments.

As employers of all sizes search for alternatives to increasingly costly group policy coverage, private exchanges are expected to grow in popularity. In fact, the consulting firm Accenture predicts that “private exchange participation will approach public exchange enrollment levels as soon as 2017 and surpass them soon thereafter.” And that “in 2017, approximately 18 percent of the American public will purchase insurance through exchanges, radically transforming the health insurance landscape.”

Most consultants expect mid-sized and large employers – 100 – 500+ employee size – will drive adoption of private exchanges in the employer group space. These size organizations employ nearly two-thirds of all U.S. employees and are required to offer health benefits under the Employer Shared Responsibility Provision of the ACA. As individuals become more comfortable with making their own health care purchases, and technology simplifies and supports the shopping process, private exchanges will become an increasingly common solution for buying employer-sponsored health care.

Broker-Sponsored Private Exchanges

Another area where we are seeing adoption of private exchange models is in the broker market. While larger size employers turn to benefit consultants for their private exchange solutions, insurance brokers are also looking to private exchange solutions to support their clients as well. Brokers are under increasing margin pressure because of medical loss ratio (MLR) rules and are increasingly looking to technology to grow the volume of transactions they can manage without having to add staff. The key here is a solution that can effectively handle plans and rates from multiple carriers and ancillary providers. This is one area we have been focused on here at Benefitalign – building a robust plan and rate repository to manage all this data and make it easy to use for brokers.

Another challenge for brokers is they often have very seasonal sales – especially in the “on exchange” market. With 90+ percent of their business coming in 90 days, they really need to have a streamlined process to shop, compare and enroll members. The group market may have a less compressed sales cycle, but the multi-step sales process and the greater amount of information brokers need to collect create other challenges. A well-designed private exchange can help through the automation of processes, data validation and member self-service tools.

Another part of the equation for brokers is pricing of a private exchange solution. Seasonal business also brings with it seasonal revenues. A broker may see much lower revenues during the summer months, so finding a private exchange solution with flexible pricing is a critical factor as well.

Public/Private Exchanges

A final space where we are seeing an interest in private exchanges is in states. As of mid-2015, approximately half of the states are leveraging the federal exchange for individual and SHOP plans instead of setting up their own state-based exchange.

Private exchanges are beginning to pop up as competition to the public exchanges. For instance, Florida has Florida Health Choices and New Mexico has TrueCoverage. These publically available “private exchanges” can offer residents additional plan choices, including ancillary plans, that public exchanges do not include. Look for these public/private exchanges to continue to grow in popularity, especially in those states with only a federal exchange option.

Private Exchange Takeaways

  • Private exchange adoption is following a “top-down”’ approach in the employer space, with larger size employer leading the way. Small groups will likely embrace private exchanges as well – just more slowly.
  • A private exchange can also support brokers looking to grow efficiently, especially in the more complex group market, but pricing is probably as important as the technology.
  • States – especially those who rely on the federal exchange to power their state exchanges – are open to the private sector to offer alternative public/private exchange solutions in their states.

The growth of private exchanges parallels the growth of health care consumerism and the increasing use of technology to support health care shopping. A private exchange solution can really enable a win/win situation for employers and employees by providing education, choice and cost predictability. It also provides a solid foundation for brokers looking to grow, and unique options for states looking for alternatives to costly state-sponsored public exchanges.

No matter where you look, private exchanges are here to stay and will only continue to grow in use.

Source: http://www.theihcc.com/en/communities/health_care_exchange_solutions/private-exchanges-continue-to-grow-in-popularity-b_iebo9je9.html

The 2015 Defined Contribution Health Optimization Summit

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networking_banners_fDecember 1-2, 2015 | Miami Beach, FL

Maximizing Private Exchange ROI, Sales and Engagement for an Emerging Class of Healthcare Consumer

This program will go back to the nuts and bolts of the Defined Contribution model, explore the implementation of a holistic approach and examine how health plans and benefits administrators can work together to achieve optimization.  This unique summit will bring together fresh perspectives from a wide array of thought leaders in healthcare, benefit design and administration, and health and wellness programs to examine how forward-thinking companies and health plans are reshaping Defined Contribution Health.  Ensure you don’t get left behind as innovation unfolds!

Attendees will have the opportunity to meet with Benefitalign experts, discuss their business challenges and prepare a successful road map for 2016 and beyond.

Email contact@benefitalign.com to schedule a meeting.

Fifth Annual IHC FORUM West

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gen-eblast_west2aNovember 16-18, 2015 | Red Rock Resort | Las Vegas

Join us at booth #209 for cost-saving, empowering tools, top-quality solutions and a clear understanding of the changing landscape in health and benefits.

Girish Panicker, Chief Commercial Officer, Benefitalign, will be speaking on the topic “Private Exchanges: Models, Experiences, and What Is Coming for 2016.” The panel session is at 11:00 a.m. on Wednesday, November 18th, 2015. 

The fifth annual IHC FORUM West in Las Vegas is part of the ONLY conference series 100-percent dedicated to health care consumerism – where employers, brokers, health plans, TPAs, consultants and providers gather under one roof to LEARN, CONNECT and SHARE best practices, innovation and expert insights.

Attendees will have the opportunity to meet with Benefitalign experts, discuss their business challenges and prepare a successful roadmap for 2016 and beyond.

Email contact@benefitalign.com to schedule a meeting.

 

The Private Exchange FORUM Pre-Conference Episode

HealthCare Consumerism Radio, August 28, 2015

With only a few days until the next Private Exchange FORUM kicks off in Baltimore, hosts Andrew Dietz and Doug Field will welcome special guests from PlanSource and benefitalign — sponsors of the upcoming event — to the program for a comprehensive discussion on all things private exchanges.

The first guest on this week’s program will be George Tzinas, the chief experience officer at benefitalign, a comprehensive, cloud-based platform that enables your organization to rapidly launch shopping and enrollment solutions — including private exchanges — across all lines of business. In this interview, George and the hosts will review of how employers, brokers and some states are looking to health insurance exchanges to support the needs of their enrollees. George will also provide a snapshot of who is currently using a private exchange and why and some of the key points to consider when launching an exchange.

The second guest on the show will be Scott Carver, president of PlanSource. In this interview, Scott and the hosts will discuss recent news from PlanSource, outline the private exchange model and analyze how its growing popularity is reshaping the industry. Forty-five percent of employers say they are considering private exchanges for their full-time employees before 2018. Scott will also address some of the questions facing employers as they determine the best way to administer employee benefits and explain the range of private exchange models available and the advantages of each.

Listen to the interview